Just some reblogs of things I enjoy. Look under the tab on the left for links to my art blog, and other stuff

galaxyspeaking:

Did I mention how much I loved My mad fat diary ? Here’s a little gif of Finn Nelson (yes, the cigarette smoke IS moving I swear).. I think I’m going to do gifs for the whole gang :D !

galaxyspeaking:

Did I mention how much I loved My mad fat diary ? Here’s a little gif of Finn Nelson (yes, the cigarette smoke IS moving I swear).. I think I’m going to do gifs for the whole gang :D !

FILED UNDER: art  my mad fat diary  *A*  







Tutorial: from paper to digital. 

kaiami:

Hey ya’ll! I’m not much of a tutorial person, but this was a technique that I learned from Syuzuki, one of my favorite artists back in the day, when I was 13. I memorized the technique and it’s been one of the most useful things I can do on photoshop. This was something that really helped me, and I hope that it will be useful for even some of you.

In this tutorial, I will be going step by step how I take something from my sketchbook and color it on photoshop.

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FILED UNDER: ref  reference  art ref  art reference  







How to Create a Plot Outline in Eight Easy Steps  

writeworld:

by Glen Strathy

Here’s an easy way to come up with a brief plot outline for your novel.

One of the most powerful secrets to creating plots that are emotionally compelling is to incorporate the 8 Basic Plot Elements. Starting with your story idea, you only need to make eight choices to ensure the plot of your future novel hangs together in a meaningful way.

The best part is that you can make these choices and construct a brief plot outline in less than an hour.

Sound intriguing? Then let’s get started.

Read More

FILED UNDER: ref  reference  writing  







psych-facts:

You can find more posts like these here

FILED UNDER: psychology  misc  







Visual Development from Tangled by Laurent Ben-Mimoun

FILED UNDER: tangled  Disney  art  ref  misc  







cellokind:

 

FILED UNDER: interesting  misc  







truebluemeandyou:

DIY Know Your Sunglasses from Enerie here. For the popular posts Know Your Shoes go here for part 1 (Lobster Claws anyone? Hilarious) and here for part 2.

FILED UNDER: ref  art ref  reference  








Costume Designs from Frozen by Brittney Lee

Costume Designs from Frozen by Brittney Lee

FILED UNDER: concept art  art  Disney  







O Little Town of ReineReine in WinterReinefjord Rorbuers
Jonathan Zdziarski

FILED UNDER: nature  scenery  landscapes  ref  







A Song of Ice and Fire fanmix; 3 books and 4 seasons. 

FILED UNDER: mix  fanmix  game of thrones  







fucktonofanatomyreferences:

A mouth-watering fuck-ton of gun references.

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Before you draw any gun, be absolutely certain you are familiar with the parts of a gun. That sounds cliché and dumb, but if you end up wondering “Why does this thing look so shitty?” it’s probably ‘cause you don’t know how a gun works. Know how it moves and what fits in where. And please know where the hands are placed when firing!!! If you hold a gun at the wrong place, you can lose a finger! Also know where the head will be positioned. The person will be looking down the barrel to line up the sights (the two protruding thingies at the top that help you pinpoint your target). Don’t know enough about guns, let alone what type to utilize? Here:

World Guns. Thought it was kinda funny. Sweet list though. wmm Varmint never works Fishgun HAHAHAHA OPERATOR HUM! FUTURE gangsta ham heats 1911 snake‘? snaake!

[And of course, disclaimer: I’m not racist or biased because of “kraut” and “kike”; I find slurs humourous, which is why I don’t get offended when people call me “faggot” or “jap.” So cool your tits please and try to see the funny side for once.]

And if you’re uber pro on guns, here’s an orgasmic list: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_firearms

AND if you wanna get a little creative:

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I’m always a fan of the minigun………

Sourced by Frenchy-lu:

http://www.animebooks.com/copostgrdrgu.html
http://674967490674.beon.ru/0-565-pjat-sot-shest-desjat-dva.zhtml (img 2;6;7;8)
http://zilliah.tumblr.com/post/49680908299 (img 3 to 5)
http://referensu.tumblr.com/post/30449682000/fungii-the-book-does-have-a-basic-breakdown-of
http://laforetdesreves.blogspot.fr/2012_06_01_archive.html
http://pudelekx.pl/science-bitch-czyli-jak-to-dziala-17098-g20#galeria
http://static.fjcdn.com/large/pictures/98/41/984182_2186295.jpg
http://www.heromachine.com/2008/10/24/guns-guns-and-more-guns/

FILED UNDER: weapons  ref  reference  art ref  







art-of-swords:

Daggers and Poniards of the Christian Middle Ages
The illustrations and descriptions have been taken from "An Illustrated History of Arms and Armour: From the Earliest Period to the Present Time," by Auguste Demmin, and translated by Charles Christopher Black. Published in 1894 by George Bell.
British cutlass, tenth century. It bears on the blade the names “Edwardus,” and “prins agile.” It is attributed to Edward II.
Iron dagger, about a foot long, thirteenth century.
Iron dagger, thirteenth century. Blade measures about 12 inches, and the haft about 5 inches.
Iron poniard, probably Scottish, fourteenth century.
Same as above.
Poniard, beginning of the fourteenth century.
Iron dagger, about 14 inches long, beginning of the fourteenth century. The haft is very long.
Iron dagger, about 19 1/2 inches long, end of the fourteenth century.
Iron dagger, 14 1/2 inches long, end of the fourteenth century. The handle is of carved bone.
Iron dagger, end of the fourteenth or beginning of the fifteenth century.
Poniard, end of the fourteenth century.
Dagger, fifteenth century.
Scottish dagger, about 14 1/2 inches long, wooden handle, fifteenth century.
Dagger with single thumb ring, about 16 inches long, fifteenth century.
Dagger with double thumb ring, sixteenth century. The two rings were placed there to fix the dagger on a shaft, or at the end of a lance, to resist cavalry.
Dagger, anelace, or Verona dagger, fifteenth century.
Dagger, anelace, fifteenth century.
Dagger, fifteenth century.
Dagger of a German lansquenet, sixteenth century, about 14 inches long. Polished steel sheath.
Dagger of German lansquenet, sixteenth century.
Main gauche, Spanish, with the inscription “Viva Felipe V.,” which shows that this weapon was in use in the year 1701.
Stiletto (Spitzdolch), about 12 inches long, end of the sixteenth century. In Germany these weapons were also called Panzerbrecher, or cuirass-breaker.
Dagger, Swiss, sixteenth century. These daggers are often provided with small knives, which served to cut the thongs of the armour, to pierce holes, and for various purposes.
Dagger, German, sixteenth century.
Poniard, German, with wavy blade, very short and broad.
Poniard, German, sixteenth century. The guard has four quillons.
Main gauche, sixteenth century.
Main gauche, German, sixteenth century.
Main gauche, German, about 20 inches long, sixteenth century. Engraved handle.
Main gauche, German, with indented blade for breaking the enemy’s sword; thumb ring, and quillons curved in inverse directions; sixteenth century.
Main gauche, German, with indented blade for breaking swords, sixteenth century.
Close-up of indented blade of previous dagger.
Large German brise-épée, sixteenth century.
Close-up of indented blade of previous dagger.
Poniard, German, sixteenth century.
Large main gauche, German, with indented quillons, and grated guard as sword-breaker, seventeenth century. It measures about 25 by 10 inches.
Stiletto, German, called Panzerbrecher, or cuirass-breaker, about 12 inches long, sixteenth century.
Poniard, about 10 inches long, richly studded with precious stones. This weapon belonged to Sobieski, King of Poland.
Poniard, German, called Panzerbrecher. The numbers on the blade probably used for measuring the bore of cannons.

art-of-swords:

Daggers and Poniards of the Christian Middle Ages

The illustrations and descriptions have been taken from "An Illustrated History of Arms and Armour: From the Earliest Period to the Present Time," by Auguste Demmin, and translated by Charles Christopher Black. Published in 1894 by George Bell.

  1. British cutlass, tenth century. It bears on the blade the names “Edwardus,” and “prins agile.” It is attributed to Edward II.
  2. Iron dagger, about a foot long, thirteenth century.
  3. Iron dagger, thirteenth century. Blade measures about 12 inches, and the haft about 5 inches.
  4. Iron poniard, probably Scottish, fourteenth century.
  5. Same as above.
  6. Poniard, beginning of the fourteenth century.
  7. Iron dagger, about 14 inches long, beginning of the fourteenth century. The haft is very long.
  8. Iron dagger, about 19 1/2 inches long, end of the fourteenth century.
  9. Iron dagger, 14 1/2 inches long, end of the fourteenth century. The handle is of carved bone.
  10. Iron dagger, end of the fourteenth or beginning of the fifteenth century.
  11. Poniard, end of the fourteenth century.
  12. Dagger, fifteenth century.
  13. Scottish dagger, about 14 1/2 inches long, wooden handle, fifteenth century.
  14. Dagger with single thumb ring, about 16 inches long, fifteenth century.
  15. Dagger with double thumb ring, sixteenth century. The two rings were placed there to fix the dagger on a shaft, or at the end of a lance, to resist cavalry.
  16. Dagger, anelace, or Verona dagger, fifteenth century.
  17. Dagger, anelace, fifteenth century.
  18. Dagger, fifteenth century.
  19. Dagger of a German lansquenet, sixteenth century, about 14 inches long. Polished steel sheath.
  20. Dagger of German lansquenet, sixteenth century.
  21. Main gauche, Spanish, with the inscription “Viva Felipe V.,” which shows that this weapon was in use in the year 1701.
  22. Stiletto (Spitzdolch), about 12 inches long, end of the sixteenth century. In Germany these weapons were also called Panzerbrecher, or cuirass-breaker.
  23. Dagger, Swiss, sixteenth century. These daggers are often provided with small knives, which served to cut the thongs of the armour, to pierce holes, and for various purposes.
  24. Dagger, German, sixteenth century.
  25. Poniard, German, with wavy blade, very short and broad.
  26. Poniard, German, sixteenth century. The guard has four quillons.
  27. Main gauche, sixteenth century.
  28. Main gauche, German, sixteenth century.
  29. Main gauche, German, about 20 inches long, sixteenth century. Engraved handle.
  30. Main gauche, German, with indented blade for breaking the enemy’s sword; thumb ring, and quillons curved in inverse directions; sixteenth century.
  31. Main gauche, German, with indented blade for breaking swords, sixteenth century.
  32. Close-up of indented blade of previous dagger.
  33. Large German brise-épée, sixteenth century.
  34. Close-up of indented blade of previous dagger.
  35. Poniard, German, sixteenth century.
  36. Large main gauche, German, with indented quillons, and grated guard as sword-breaker, seventeenth century. It measures about 25 by 10 inches.
  37. Stiletto, German, called Panzerbrecher, or cuirass-breaker, about 12 inches long, sixteenth century.
  38. Poniard, about 10 inches long, richly studded with precious stones. This weapon belonged to Sobieski, King of Poland.
  39. Poniard, German, called Panzerbrecher. The numbers on the blade probably used for measuring the bore of cannons.
FILED UNDER: weapons  ref  reference  art ref  







sosuperawesome:

Wandering in the Woods, Oer-Wout

FILED UNDER: forest  aesthetics  misc  







theblacklacedandy:

Perfection

FILED UNDER: tea  ref  misc  







Obscure Color Words 

FILED UNDER: color  words  ref  misc